Top stories featured on ScienceDaily's Space & Time, Matter & Energy, and Computers & Math sections.
  1. Charge model for calculating the photoexcited states of one-dimensional Mott insulators

    Researchers have developed a charge model to describe photoexcited states of one-dimensional Mott insulators. They have also succeeded in constructing a many-body Wannier function as the localized basis state of the photoexcited states and calculating large-system, optical conductivity spectra that can be compared with experimental results.
  2. Here and gone: Outbound comets are likely of alien origin

    Astronomers at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) have analyzed the paths of two objects heading out of the Solar System forever and determined that they also most likely originated from outside of the Solar System. These results improve our understanding of the outer Solar System and beyond.
  3. Self-assembled artificial microtubules developed

    Simple LEGO bricks can be assembled to more complicated structures, which can be further associated into a wide variety of complex architectures, from automobiles, rockets, and ships to gigantic castles and amusement parks. Such an event of multi-step assembly, so-called 'hierarchical self-assembly', also happens in living organisms.
  4. Internet use reduces study skills in university students

    Research has shown that students who use digital technology excessively are less motivated to engage with their studies, and are more anxious about tests. This effect was made worse by the increased feelings of loneliness that use of digital technology produced.
  5. How sensitive can a quantum detector be?

    Measuring the energy of quantum states requires detecting energy changes so exceptionally small they are hard to pick out from background fluctuations, like using only a thermometer to try and work out if someone has blown out a candle in the room you're in. New research presents sensitive quantum thermometry hitting the bounds that nature allows.
  6. Edible 'security tag' to protect drugs from counterfeit

    Researchers are aiming to stump drug counterfeiters with an edible 'security tag' embedded into medicine. To imitate the drug, a counterfeiter would have to uncrack a complicated puzzle of patterns not fully visible to the naked eye.
  7. Billions of quantum entangled electrons found in 'strange metal'

    Physicists have observed quantum entanglement among 'billions of billions' of flowing electrons in a quantum critical material. The research provides the strongest direct evidence to date of entanglement's role in bringing about quantum criticality.
  8. Improved brain chip for precision medicine

    A biomedical research team is reporting an improvement on a microfluidic brain cancer chip. The new chip allows quick assessment of the effectiveness of cancer drugs on brain tumors.
  9. How anti-sprawl policies may be harming water quality

    Urban growth boundaries are created by governments in an effort to concentrate urban development -- buildings, roads and the utilities that support them -- within a defined area. These boundaries are intended to decrease negative impacts on people and the environment. However, according to a researcher, policies that aim to reduce urban sprawl may be increasing water pollution.
  10. Organized cybercrime -- not your average mafia

    Scientists have identified common attributes of cybercrime networks, revealing how these groups function and work together to cause an estimated $445-600 billion of harm globally per year.